What happens to the dying body?

 

“An excellent and very informative presentation. Thank you.” (from a nurse)

“That was brilliant.” (from a family doctor)

“Thank you Amanda and Renee, this is fantastic information.” (from someone with terminal cancer)

“Lots I didn’t know and when do we ever talk about this stuff.” – Julie

“Thank you for your presentation – it made hearing about what happens when someone dies very clear. From speaking with many people, this is something they have valued – learning what is ‘normal’ when someone they love is dying.” – Mary

 

Modern medicine has sanitised and medicalised death.  The younger generations may have little contact with elderly relatives who are frail and ultimately die.  As a Western society we have lost the art of being able to recognise the normal signs and symptoms of a dying body.  Consequently we worry relentlessly about our loved one’s suffering, without understanding what they are actually going through.  This webinar will discuss what happens within the body when it is dying, moving from the brain down to the gut and beyond.  It will help explain some of the experiences people have shortly before they die.

This webinar is informative enough to be interesting for medical practitioners, but will use easy-to-understand language suitable for everyone.

 

Dr Amanda Landers is a community palliative care physician working in the Canterbury region for Nurse Maude Hospice Palliative Care service.  She also supports the West Coast Palliative Care team and is always looking for ways to collaborate with other neighbouring regions. Her current areas of interest are people with non-malignant palliative care needs, especially chronic obstructive airways disease.  She is currently doing research into lymphoedema, pancreatic cancer and models of rural palliative care delivery.

She is now a Senior Clinical Lecturer at the Otago Medical School, currently developing a new Palliative and End-of-Life Care Module in Christchurch.  Education is a major focus for her and she has given presentations to a variety of audiences including nurses, allied health, other medical practitioners, as well as the general public.